Colorado school kicks student out of class for having a Gadsden flag patch on his bag

The incident occurred at The Vanguard School. The school's principal acknowledged that the flag originated in the Revolutionary War in a non-racial context, but insisted that it has been used for racial purposes.

Connor Boyack, president of the Libertas Institute, posted the story of a boy from Colorado who was kicked out of class for having a Gadsden flag patch on his bag. The school claimed it is a symbol that has "origins with slavery.”

The incident occurred at The Vanguard School. A video was shared online showing the child's mother questioning the school’s arguments. An email from the school's principal claims the patch was "disruptive to the classroom environment."

Principal Jeff Yocum admitted that the flag originated in the Revolutionary War in a non-racial context. However, he insists that the historical origins and meaning of the symbol do not matter because, according to him, it has also been used for racial purposes.

"The director then argued that the flag is associated with 'hate groups,' linking to this weak article that cites a 'graphic design scholar' who claimed that 'some may now see the Gadsden flag as a symbol of intolerance and hate—or even racism,” Connor Boyack explained.

The reality is that the flag patch is not related to slavery or racism. The flag was used during the American Revolution. This was confirmed by the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission of the United States.

In fact, Colorado Governor Jared Polis also spoke out and argued that it is a symbol that enhances American values. "The Gadsden flag is a proud symbol of the American revolution and an iconic warning to Britain or any government not to violate the liberties of Americans. It appears on popular American medallions and challenge coins through today and Ben Franklin also adopted it to symbolize the union of the 13 colonies," Governor Polis said on X (Twitter).